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Apple Technology Through History

by Brian Connor

Did not have enough time to take a look at the technology headlines over the weekend?

Apple’s enormous iPhone launch event is and the gossip mill is in overdrive in what the company might unveil. The most recent rumors tip vibrant iPhones, but what else is on tap for tomorrow? Check out our latest iPhone rumor roundup, along with 11 Things We need from 5C. And the iPhone 5S

In other news, a new report in the German newspaper Der Spiegel indicates that the National Security Agency has uncovered systems for tapping into smartphone users’ data. That report comes after files released by NSA leaker Edward Snowden disclosed that its British counterpart, GCHQ and the NSA, have deciphered Web encryptions designed to protect users’ privacy. The bureaus’ tactics date back to 2000, when billions were invested by the NSA in custom computers built to break codes all part of an attempt to ramp up public eavesdropping.

Meanwhile, if you’re thinking about checking out the new Xbox One dashboard might seem like, we’ve the right news.

Apple is prudently instituting a trade in policy to keep those iPhones moving. It is a good idea and will achieve two things: enable newbies to be introduced with versions that are refurbished and keep sales high.

What’s inquisitive about that policy is it harkens back to the heydays. Trade-ins were milked by the car companies by radically altering car designs each year. A 1956 Chevy didn’t look like a 1957 Chevy, which seemed nothing like a 1958 Chevy. Obviously, most of the intestines were the same, but paint colors and the interior styling were different.

But this happening was short lived. My guess is the drop stemmed from a classic Detroit quality control problem: so you kept your older car the autos became less dependable and junkier.

By the 1970s the autos were miserable. The styling was boring; the quality crummier, and the entire trade in notion was disappearing quickly. Folks were turning to imports.

This very same thing will occur with the iPhone. It cannot continue eternally, although since the trade in idea is just beginning, I’d expect it would last at least a decade.

The operations which will decimate the iPhone company will undoubtedly come from India or China. By making high-quality, low-cost products in the beginning, these businesses will be given a foothold. Things will worsen and we’ll observe an onslaught of crummy phones that will make the whole landscape lose its luster, as the company blows away the competition.

At that point things should stabilize.

So just like the 1950s car business, a cycle happens and quality returns after a period that is down. And though the reasons for this particular cycle will change from that you may make certain it’ll happen.

Note this in the case of the auto industry the year-to-year trade-in’s entire notion was lost in the shuffle. To put it differently, take advantage of that while you are able to. That will not be long, although it’s great while it continues.

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